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About this book

This visionary textbook is the third edition of a trusted and highly respected introduction to community psychology. The editors have focused on three contemporary social issues in order to illustrate key concepts throughout the book: climate change, affordable housing and homelessness, and immigration.

Featuring a wide range of critical perspectives from international scholars and practitioners, Community Psychology encourages students to consider theories and methodologies in light of how they might be applied to different cultures and settings. It develops students' ability to think critically about the role of psychology in society, and about how the work of community psychologists can aid in the liberation of oppressed groups, promoting social justice and flourishing both for people and for our planet.

This book is essential reading for students taking both undergraduate and graduate courses in Community Psychology and its related fields.

Table of Contents

Framing Community Psychology: History, Values, and Key Concepts

Frontmatter

1. Community Psychology: Research and Action for Social Change and Wellbeing

Abstract
The goal of this chapter is to provide you with an introduction to CP.
Manuel Riemer, Stephanie M. Reich, Scotney D. Evans, Geoffrey Nelson, Isaac Prilleltensky

2. Highlights of the History of Community Psychology

Abstract
As Chapter 1 described, CP is a value-driven, action-oriented field, focused on reducing oppression and supporting individual, group, and collective wellbeing (Prilleltensky, 2003).
Manuel Riemer, Stephanie M. Reich, Scotney D. Evans, Geoffrey Nelson, Isaac Prilleltensky

3. Community Psychology Values and Vision

Abstract
Have you ever heard of or been asked to make a vision board? It’s a collage of things you hope for yourself in the future.
Manuel Riemer, Stephanie M. Reich, Scotney D. Evans, Geoffrey Nelson, Isaac Prilleltensky

4. Power, Empowerment, and Depowerment

Abstract
In this chapter, we introduce you to some conceptualizations of power and the challenges of defining the construct and recognizing it in practice.
Manuel Riemer, Stephanie M. Reich, Scotney D. Evans, Geoffrey Nelson, Isaac Prilleltensky

5. Thinking Like a System: Ecology and Complexity in a Globalized World

Abstract
Social workers and counselors often use “Ecomaps“ when working with their clients to understand an individual’s or family’s relationships with people, groups, and organizations.
Manuel Riemer, Stephanie M. Reich, Scotney D. Evans, Geoffrey Nelson, Isaac Prilleltensky

6. Prevention, Promotion, and Social Change

Abstract
Reflecting on your childhood, think of some stressful situations or contexts that threatened your sense of wellbeing.
Tod Sloan, Fernando Lacerda, Mariah Kornbluh, Susan Eckerle

7. Community, Connection, and Participations

Abstract
As a warm-up to this chapter, make a list of all the things that make up the community where you currently live.
Manuel Riemer, Stephanie M. Reich, Scotney D. Evans, Geoffrey Nelson, Isaac Prilleltensky

Community Psychology Interventions

Frontmatter

8. An Overview of Community Psychology Interventions

Abstract
In the field of education, much has been written about school improvement, school change and educational reform.
Manuel Riemer, Stephanie M. Reich, Scotney D. Evans, Geoffrey Nelson, Isaac Prilleltensky

9. Social Interventions

Abstract
Picture a delicious apple pie. Now imagine that whole pie represents 100 percent of the wealth owned by residents of the US.
Manuel Riemer, Stephanie M. Reich, Scotney D. Evans, Geoffrey Nelson, Isaac Prilleltensky

10. Organizational and Community Interventions

Abstract
All of us interact with organizations in some way just about every day.
Manuel Riemer, Stephanie M. Reich, Scotney D. Evans, Geoffrey Nelson, Isaac Prilleltensky

11. Individual and Small Group Interventions

Abstract
As community psychologists who work across ecological levels – from trying to provide care and support for people who have experienced extreme suffering to affecting policy and economic conditions – we are often faced with the question of which level we should intervene at and where to target our limited resources (including our time).
Manuel Riemer, Stephanie M. Reich, Scotney D. Evans, Geoffrey Nelson, Isaac Prilleltensky

Community-engaged Research

Frontmatter

12. Framing Community-engaged Research

Abstract
In Box 12.1, we describe two different studies that focus on the same issue (body weight and shape preoccupation) with the same type of participant (young female dancers) in the context of co-educational dance studios.
Manuel Riemer, Stephanie M. Reich, Scotney D. Evans, Geoffrey Nelson, Isaac Prilleltensky

13. The Research Cycle

Abstract
In Part II, we spoke to the importance of being consistent with our community psychology (CP) values when we design interventions to support individuals, organizations, and communities in promoting positive changes towards generalized wellbeing.
Manuel Riemer, Stephanie M. Reich, Scotney D. Evans, Geoffrey Nelson, Isaac Prilleltensky

Issues in Community Psychology

Frontmatter

14. Globalization, Poverty, and Social Justice

Abstract
Over a billion people on the planet live in households that survive on the equivalent of a few dollars a day.
Manuel Riemer, Stephanie M. Reich, Scotney D. Evans, Geoffrey Nelson, Isaac Prilleltensky

15. Colonization

Abstract
In this chapter an Australian Aboriginal woman, a Māori woman, and a Pākehā (White) New Zealander draw on their life experiences and work as community psychologists to discuss colonization, racism, and decolonization.
Pat Dudgeon, Marewa Glover, Ingrid Huygens

16. How Can Community Psychologists Best Work Towards Gender Equity?

Abstract
Think of some ways that gender impacts on your life.
Heather Gridley, Colleen Turner, Ronelle Carolissen, Sherine Van Wyk, Monica Madyaningrum

17. Building Wellbeing in Families

Abstract
Reflecting on your childhood, think about the resources you had in your family and in your community.
Leslea Peirson, Glynis Clacherty, Melissa L. Whitson

18. LGBTQ Issues in Community Psychology

Abstract
What do you know about lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) people and the challenges they face? If your knowledge level is very low, why do you think this is so?
Lauren Munro, Robb Travers

19. Ableism, Physical Disability, and Community Living

Abstract
The goal of this chapter is to provide you with an introduction to the contemporary understanding of disability and some of its accompanying challenges.
Thilo Kroll, Glen White

20. Racism and Applications of Critical Race and Intersectional Theories in Community Psychology

Abstract
The goal for this chapter is to examine how action and research can help people with serious mental health problems achieve their hopes for liberation, wellbeing, and recovery.
Bret Kloos

21. Racism and Applications of Critical Race and Intersectional Theories in Community Psychology

Abstract
The historical construct of race while reflecting on the differences and similarities in manifestations of racism in several forms, including Indigenous erasure, anti-Blackness, and xenophobia
Ciann L. Wilson, Natasha Afua Darko, Amandeep Kaur Singh, Brianna Hunt
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