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About this book

This comprehensive textbook introduces readers to the three-tiered, Model-View-Controller (MVC) architecture by using Hibernate, JSPs, and Java Servlets. These three technologies all use Java, so that a student with a background in programming will be able to master them with ease, with the end result of being able to create web applications that use MVC, validate user input and save data to a database.
Features: presents the many topics of web development in small steps, in an accessible, easy-to-follow style; uses powerful technologies that are freely available on the web to speed up web development, such as JSP, JavaBeans, annotations, JSTL, Java 1.5, Hibernate and Tomcat; discusses HTML, HTML Forms, Cascading Style Sheets and XML; introduces core technologies from the outset, such as the MVC architecture; contains questions and exercises at the end of each chapter, detailed illustrations, chapter summaries, and a glossary; includes examples for accessing common web services.

Table of Contents

1. Browser-Server Communication

Abstract
This chapter explains how information is sent from a browser to a server. It begins with a description of the request from a browser and a response from a server. Each of these has a format that is determined by the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP).
Tim Downey

2. Controllers

Abstract
Web applications are more similar than different. If you describe a website where you buy things, you will probably say that there is a page where you enter personal information, then there is a page where you confirm that your information is correct and then the site processes your order. These pages could be named the edit page, the confirm page and the process page. For the next few chapters, this will be the basic structure of all the examples of web applications.
Tim Downey

3. Java Beans and Controller Helpers

Abstract
With the introduction of a controller servlet, it is now possible to add all the power and convenience of Java to the development process. It is possible to create auxiliary classes in the web application that will simplify development.
Tim Downey

4. Enhancing the Controller

Abstract
The previous chapter introduced the idea of a helper class that has easy access to all the objects that are used in a controller application: the bean, the request, the response. This chapter builds on this framework and adds features to the helper class and its base class.
Tim Downey

5. Hibernate

Abstract
Two very important processes are needed in any website: data validation and data persistence. Both of these can be automated with a package named Hibernate.
Tim Downey

6. Advanced HTML and Form Elements

Abstract
The first time I saw a web page, I was amazed at hypertext links, images, advanced layout, colours and fonts. Of these, hypertext links already existed in another protocol on the web: gopher. Gopher used a series of index pages to navigate a site; the links on one index would take you to another index page or to some text file. Libraries were the principal users of the gopher protocol. A lot of information could be retrieved using gopher; however, it never became popular like the web. It was the remaining features that made the web as popular as it is: images, advanced layout, colours and fonts.
Tim Downey

7. Accounts, Cookies and Carts

Abstract
An application will be developed that requires a user to log into the site. Once the user has logged in, the user’s previous data will be retrieved from the database.
Tim Downey

8. Web Services and Legacy Databases

Abstract
In addition to developing a stand-alone web application, it is possible to connect to other web applications to simplify processing the user’s data. Such a web application is known as a web service. For instance, there are services for calculating shipping costs, for accepting online payments and for finding maps. These services are not designed to interface with a user, but rather to interact with other web applications.
Tim Downey

9. Appendix

Abstract
While simple Java applications can be created with a text editor, it is more difficult to create web applications because they run on a servlet engine. It is more efficient to use an IDE that can interact seamlessly with the servlet engine. A brief introduction will be given to two popular IDEs: NetBeans and Eclipse.
Tim Downey
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