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About this book

This textbook is a systematic guide to the steps in setting up a Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) improvement initiative. Readers will learn the project management practices necessary to deliver high-quality software solutions to the customer on time and on budget. The text also highlights how software process improvement can achieve specific business goals to provide a tangible return on investment. Topics and features: supplies review questions, summaries and key topics for each chapter, as well as a glossary of acronyms; describes the CMMI model thoroughly, detailing the five maturity levels; provides a broad overview of software engineering; reviews the activities and teams required to set up a CMMI improvement initiative; examines in detail the implementation of CMMI in a typical organization at each of the maturity levels; investigates the various tools that support organizations in improving their software engineering maturity; discusses the SCAMPI appraisal methodology.

Table of Contents

1. Motivation for Software Process Improvement

Abstract
The information society and knowledge economy is an integral part of the world we live in, and software is at the heart of modern business and is pervasive throughout society. New technologies such as the World Wide Web and mobile phones have transformed our lives, and software is an integral part of these technologies. Companies have changed their way of doing business to take advantage of new technologies, and major changes have been made to the business processes in banks, insurance companies, and the travel industry.
Gerard O’Regan

2. Software Engineering

Abstract
The NATO Science Committee organized two famous conferences on software engineering in the late 1960s. The first conference was held in Garmisch, Germany, in 1968 and this was followed by a second conference in Rome in 1969. Over 50 people from 11 countries attended the Garmisch conference, and the attendees included the eminent Dutch computer scientist, Edsger Djkstra, who did important theoretical work on formal specification and verification.
Gerard O’Regan

3. Capability Maturity Model IntegrationCapability Maturity Model Integration

Abstract
The SEI was founded by the US Congress in 1984 and has worked successfully in advancing software engineering practices in the USA and worldwide. It performs research to find solutions to key software engineering problems, and its proposed solutions are validated through pilots. These solutions are then disseminated to the wider software engineering community through its training programme. The SEI’s research and maturity models have played an important role in helping companies to deliver high-quality software consistently on-time and on-budget.
Gerard O’Regan

4. Setting Up a CMMI Initiative

Abstract
The implementation of the CMMI is a project and as with any project it needs good planning and project management to ensure its success. Once an organization makes a decision to embark on a CMMI initiative, a project manager needs to be appointed to manage the project. The CMMI project manager will treat the implementation as a standard project, and plans are made to implement the CMMI within the approved schedule and budget. The improvement initiative will often consist of several improvement cycles, with each improvement cycle implementing one or more process areas.
Gerard O’Regan

5. CMMI Level 2 Implementation

Abstract
This chapter is focused on the implementation of maturity level 2 in an organization. A CMMI level 2 organization has policies for managing a project, and procedures to implement these policies have been established. Practices are in place to ensure that the process is planned, performed, and controlled, and the process is enforced with independent audits.
Gerard O’Regan

6. CMMI Level 3CMMI Level 3 Implementation

Abstract
A maturity level 3 organization has standard organization-wide processes in place that are well understood and are defined in terms of procedures and standards. These standard processes ensure consistency in the way in which projects are conducted across the organization, and best practices have been generalized for use at the organization level.
Gerard O’Regan

7. CMMI Level 4CMMI Level 4 and 5 Implementation

Abstract
A level 4 organization sets quantitative goals for the performance of key processes, and the processes are controlled using statistical techniques to meet the needs of the stakeholders. Software process and product quality goals are set and managed, and processes are stable and perform within narrowly defined limits. A level 4 organization has predictable process performance, with variation in performance identified and the causes determined and corrected.
Gerard O’Regan

8. Software Engineering ToolsSoftware Engineering Tools

Abstract
The goal of this chapter is to give a flavour of a selection of tools1 that can support the organization in various software engineering activities. The tools considered are for project management, configuration management, design and development, testing, and so on. The organization will generally choose tools to support the process rather than choosing a process to support the tool.2
Gerard O’Regan

9. SCAMPI Appraisals

Abstract
The information society and knowledge economy is an integral part of the world we live in, and software is at the heart of modern business and is pervasive throughout society. New technologies such as the World Wide Web and mobile phones have transformed our lives, and software is an integral part of these technologies. Companies have changed their way of doing business to take advantage of new technologies, and major changes have been made to the business processes in banks, insurance companies, and the travel industry.
Gerard O’Regan
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