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About this book

Implement a SOHO or SMB Linux infrastructure to expand your business and associated IT capabilities. Backed by the expertise and experienced guidance of the authors, this book provides everything you need to move your business forward.

Pro Linux System Administration makes it easy for small- to medium–sized businesses to enter the world of zero–cost software running on Linux and covers all the distros you might want to use, including Red Hat, Ubuntu, Debian, and CentOS. Pro Linux System Administration takes a layered, component–based approach to open source business systems, while training system administrators as the builders of business infrastructure.

Completely updated for this second edition, Dennis Matotek takes you through an infrastructure-as-code approach, seamlessly taking you through steps along the journey of Linux administration with all you need to master complex systems. This edition now includes Jenkins, Ansible, Logstash and more.

What You'll Learn:

Understand Linux architecture Build, back up, and recover Linux servers Create basic networks and network services with Linux Build and implement Linux infrastructure and services including mail, web, databases, and file and print Implement Linux security Resolve Linux performance and capacity planning issues

Who This Book Is For:

Small to medium–sized business owners looking to run their own IT, system administrators considering migrating to Linux, and IT systems integrators looking for an extensible Linux infrastructure management approach.

Table of Contents

The Beginning

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Introducing Linux

By James Turnbull, Peter Lieverdink, and Dennis Matotek
Abstract
You’ve decided to learn more about System Administration or run your business on free and open source (FOSS) infrastructure? Congratulations and welcome to the world of Linux and open source software! This chapter will take you through the first steps into implementing that infrastructure.
Dennis Matotek, James Turnbull, Peter Lieverdink

Chapter 2. Installing Linux

By James Turnbull, Peter Lieverdink, and Dennis Matotek
Abstract
In this chapter, we’re going to take you through the process of installing a host with CentOS and a host with Ubuntu Server. We’ll show each distribution’s installation process using the graphical installation tools and detail the options available during installation.
Dennis Matotek, James Turnbull, Peter Lieverdink

Chapter 3. Introducing VirtualBox, Git, and Vagrant

By Dennis Matotek
Abstract
However, there are many other options to deploying a Linux server—including network provisioning, deploying virtualized machine images, or launching a Linux instance in the “cloud.” There is also a greater ability now to share virtualized machines with others locally or all over the world. We are going to show one way that might be helpful for you in following this book.
Dennis Matotek, James Turnbull, Peter Lieverdink

Chapter 4. Linux Basics

By James Turnbull and Dennis Matotek
Abstract
In this chapter, we’re going to introduce you to some basic Linux concepts and skills. Some people find Linux intimidating because of what looks like arcane commands with strange switches and mysterious options. We’ll decode some of the arcane commands you’ll need to know and demonstrate these commands and their functions.
Dennis Matotek, James Turnbull, Peter Lieverdink

Chapter 5. Users and Groups

By James Turnbull and Dennis Matotek
Abstract
We explained how users and groups own files and objects. We also demonstrated how that ownership, in combination with permissions, controls access to those files and objects. Users and groups are also used to initiate and run processes.
Dennis Matotek, James Turnbull, Peter Lieverdink

Chapter 6. Startup and Services

By Dennis Matotek
Abstract
In the last few chapters, you’ve learned how to install a Linux host, explored some basic Linux concepts, and been introduced to the concept of users and groups. This chapter is going to delve deeper into the workings of your Linux host and examine the way it operates “under the hood.”
Dennis Matotek, James Turnbull, Peter Lieverdink

Chapter 7. Networking and Firewalls

By Dennis Matotek
Abstract
So far we have shown you some of the basic features of Linux, but one of the most critical features is networking. It is via networking that your host talks to other hosts and your applications communicate with your users and the world. In this chapter, we will describe how to set up your host’s networking and then how to protect that network from attackers using a firewall.
Dennis Matotek, James Turnbull, Peter Lieverdink

Chapter 8. Package Management

By James Turnbull, Peter Lieverdink, and Dennis Matotek
Abstract
As you learned in that chapter, a host can be installed with a variety of different applications, ranging from a bare-bones installation to one with every application and tool installed. But this isn’t the end of the line for installing and managing applications. Once you’ve installed your host, you’ll often need to add applications, upgrade and patch them, and sometimes remove them. This chapter explains how to do these tasks on both CentOS and Ubuntu.
Dennis Matotek, James Turnbull, Peter Lieverdink

Chapter 9. Storage Management and Disaster Recovery

By Peter Lieverdink and Dennis Matotek
Abstract
When you installed your first Linux host, you accepted all defaults when it came to setting up disks and partitions. Now that you have some basic systems administration knowledge, let’s revisit the storage configuration and see how to change it to suit your needs. We’ll look at various types of storage hardware and the ways in which you can use storage management software to your advantage. A critical part of any business is its data, so you need to make sure it is both safe and accessible and stays that way.
Dennis Matotek, James Turnbull, Peter Lieverdink

Making Linux Work for You

Frontmatter

Chapter 10. Infrastructure Services: NTP, DNS, DHCP, and SSH

By Peter Lieverdink and Dennis Matotek
Abstract
In the previous chapters, you installed your host and got to know your way around it. You then learned how to add and configure storage hardware. Now it’s time to look at how to make the software work for you. In this chapter, we will cover the infrastructure services that help you manage the basics of your network.
Dennis Matotek, James Turnbull, Peter Lieverdink

Chapter 11. Web and SQL Services

By Peter Lieverdink and Dennis Matotek
Abstract
One of the more common things you will do is set up web services. Most likely the web services will have a requirement for a Structured English Query Language (SEQUEL) database. In this chapter we are going to explore the major components of a secure web service.
Dennis Matotek, James Turnbull, Peter Lieverdink

Chapter 12. Mail Services

By James Turnbull and Dennis Matotek
Abstract
One of the most common reasons to deploy a Linux host is to provide mail services including receiving and sending e-mail and retrieving e-mail via mechanisms such as Internet Message Access Protocol (IMAP) and Post Office Protocol (POP3).
Dennis Matotek, James Turnbull, Peter Lieverdink

Chapter 13. File Sharing and Printing

By Dennis Matotek
Abstract
One of the most common office functions is sharing/printing documents and files. In this chapter, we will show you how this can be done using Linux. Linux provides many ways to share information. It can share information with Microsoft Windows clients or macOS using an integration tool called Samba. It can also share documents between Linux (and other Unix) hosts using a tool called Network File System (NFS).
Dennis Matotek, James Turnbull, Peter Lieverdink

Chapter 14. Backup and Recovery

By Dennis Matotek
Abstract
The ability to back up and restore data is critical in any organization. You need high-quality backups not only to restore deleted or overwritten data but also in many cases for legal requirements you might have in your country (e.g., related to keeping tax or customer records).
Dennis Matotek, James Turnbull, Peter Lieverdink

Chapter 15. Networking with VPNs

By James Turnbull and Dennis Matotek
Abstract
In previous chapters, we talked about a lot of the services your organization might implement (e.g., e-mail and web services). We showed you a variety of ways to deliver those services to your users and customers, including over the Internet, and to mobile users and users located at other sites. Some services, however, are simply easier and safer to deliver locally (e.g., file and print services). If your users are not located locally, then you need some way of connecting them as if they were local. Enter the virtual private network (VPN).
Dennis Matotek, James Turnbull, Peter Lieverdink

Chapter 16. Directory Services

By Dennis Matotek
Abstract
Directory services are widespread throughout major computer networks. A Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) directory is an example of this type of service. LDAP directories are special databases that usually contain usernames, passwords, common names, e-mail addresses, business addresses, and other attributes. Organizations first used directory services to facilitate the distribution of address books and user information. Since that time, directory services have grown to take on roles as the central repositories for all user information and authentication services.
Dennis Matotek, James Turnbull, Peter Lieverdink

Chapter 17. Performance Monitoring and Optimization

By Peter Lieverdink and Dennis Matotek
Abstract
Now that your host is providing you services, it is important that it continue to do so. As your business grows, so will the workload on your servers. In this chapter, we will show you how to monitor resources such as disk space and processor and RAM usage. This will help you identify performance bottlenecks and make better use of the resources you have.
Dennis Matotek, James Turnbull, Peter Lieverdink

Chapter 18. Logging and Monitoring

By James Turnbull and Dennis Matotek
Abstract
Throughout this book, we’ve talked about logging and monitoring and their value in troubleshooting your applications and services. In the first section of this chapter, we’re going to look at how logs work on the Linux operating system and how to make use of that data. We’ll look at how to store, aggregate, analyze, send alerts on, and rotate log entries and logs. We’ll also look at some tools to make it easier to interact with your logs.
Dennis Matotek, James Turnbull, Peter Lieverdink

Chapter 19. Configuration Management

By James Turnbull and Dennis Matotek
Abstract
Now that you have learned how to build the components for a few systems, we are going to show you how you can build thousands of them quickly, at the same time, and all having the right configuration for each type of system! In the last 18 chapters we wanted to show you just how each part of the Linux system was configured, what switch applied to what command, and what outcome each switch had. All this was essential to understanding what automated provisioning and configuration management are now going to do for you.
Dennis Matotek, James Turnbull, Peter Lieverdink
Additional information