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About this book

This fully revised and updated new edition of the definitive text/reference on computer network and information security presents a comprehensive guide to the repertoire of security tools, algorithms and best practices mandated by the technology we depend on. Topics and features: highlights the magnitude of the vulnerabilities, weaknesses and loopholes inherent in computer networks; discusses how to develop effective security solutions, protocols, and best practices for the modern computing environment; examines the role of legislation, regulation, and enforcement in securing computing and mobile systems; describes the burning security issues brought about by the advent of the Internet of Things and the eroding boundaries between enterprise and home networks (NEW); provides both quickly workable and more thought-provoking exercises at the end of each chapter, with one chapter devoted entirely to hands-on exercises; supplies additional support materials for instructors at an associated website.

Table of Contents

Introduction to Traditional Computer Network Security

Frontmatter

Security Issues and Challenges in the Traditional Computer Network

Frontmatter

3. Security Threats and Threat Motives to Computer Networks

Abstract
In February, 2002, the Internet security watch group CERT Coordination Center first disclosed to the global audience that global networks, including the Internet, phone systems, and the electrical power grid, are vulnerable to attack because of weakness in programming in a small but key network component. The component, an Abstract Syntax Notation One, or ASN.1, is a communication protocol used widely in the Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP).
Joseph Migga Kizza

4. Introduction to Computer Network Vulnerabilities

Abstract
System vulnerabilities are weaknesses in the software or hardware on a server or a client that can be exploited by a determined intruder to gain access to or shut down a network. Donald Pipkin defines system vulnerability as a condition, a weakness of or an absence of security procedure, or technical, physical, or other controls that could be exploited by a threat [1].
Joseph Migga Kizza

6. Scripting and Security in Computer Networks and Web Browsers

Abstract
The rapid growth of the Internet and its ability to offer services have made it the fastest-growing medium of communication today. Today’s and tomorrow’s business transactions involving financial data; product development and marketing; storage of sensitive company information; and the creation, dissemination, sharing, and storing of information are and will continue to be made online, most specifically on the Web. The automation and dynamic growth of an interactive Web has created a huge demand for a new type of Web programming to meet the growing demand of millions of Web services from users around the world. Some services and requests are tedious and others are complex, yet the rate of growth of the number of requests, the amount of services requested in terms of bandwidth, and the quality of information requested warrant a technology to automate the process. Script technology came in timely to the rescue. Scripting is a powerful automation technology on the Internet that makes the Web highly interactive.
Joseph Migga Kizza

Dealing with Computer Network Security Challenges

Frontmatter

8. Disaster Management

Abstract
Webster’s Dictionary defines disaster as a sudden misfortune, a catastrophe that affects society [1]. It is the effect of a hazardous event caused by either man or nature. Man-made disasters are those disasters that involve a human element like intent, error, or negligence. Natural disasters are those caused by the forces of nature like hurricanes, tornados, and tsunamis. Disasters, natural or man-made, may cause great devastation to society and the environment. For example, the 2006 tsunami in Southeast Asia caused both huge human losses and environment destruction. The effects of a disaster may be short lived or long lasting. Most disasters, both man-made and natural, have long-lasting effects. To mitigate disaster effects on society and businesses, disaster management skills are needed.
Joseph Migga Kizza

11. Cryptography

Abstract
So much has been said and so much has been gained; thousands of lives have been lost, and empires have fallen because a secret was not kept. Efforts to keep secrets have been made by humans probably since the beginning of humanity itself. Long ago, humans discovered the essence of secrecy. The art of keeping secrets resulted in victories in wars and in growth of mighty empires. Powerful rulers learned to keep secrets and pass information without interception; that was the beginning of cryptography. Although the basic concepts of cryptography predate the Greeks, the present word cryptography, used to describe the art of secret communication, comes from the Greek meaning “secret writing.” From its rather simple beginnings, cryptography has grown in tandem with technology, and its importance has also similarly grown. Just as in its early days, good cryptographic prowess still wins wars.
Joseph Migga Kizza

13. System Intrusion Detection and Prevention

Abstract
The psychology and politics of ownership have historically dictated that individuals and groups tend to protect valuable resources. This grew out of the fact that once a resource has been judged to have value, no matter how much protection given to it, there is always a potential that the security provided for the resource will at some point fail. This notion has driven the concept of system security and defined the disciplines of computer and computer network security. Computer network security is made up of three principles: prevention, detection, and response. Although these three are fundamental ingredients of security, most resources have been devoted to detection and prevention because if we are able to detect all security threats and prevent them, then there is no need for response.
Joseph Migga Kizza

15. Virus and Content Filtering

Abstract
As the size of global computer networks expands and the use of the Internet skyrockets, the security issues do manifest themselves not only in the security of computer networks but also in individual user security on individual PCs connected to the Internet either via an organization’s gateway or an Internet service provider (ISP). The security of every user, therefore, is paramount whether the user is a member of an organization network or a user of a home PC via an independent ISP. In either case, the effort is focused on protecting not only the data but also the user.
Joseph Migga Kizza

18. Security in Wireless Networks and Devices

Abstract
It is not feasible to discuss security in wireless networks without a thorough understanding of the working of wireless devices and networks. In fact, as we first set out to teach the computer network infrastructure in Chap. 1 in order to teach network security, we are going, in the first parts of this chapter, to discuss the wireless network infrastructure. As was the case in Chap. 1, it is not easy to discuss a network infrastructure in a few paragraphs and expect a reader to feel comfortable enough to deal with the security issues based on the infrastructure. So, although we are promising the reader to be brief, our discussion of the wireless infrastructure may seem long to some readers and sometimes confusing to others. Bear with us as we dispose of the necessary theory for a good understanding of wireless security.
Joseph Migga Kizza

20. Other Efforts to Secure Data in Computer Networks and Beyond

Abstract
The rapid advances in computer technology, the plummeting prices of information processing and indexing devices, and the development of sprawling global networks have all made the generation, collection, processing, indexing, and storage of information easy. Massive information is created, processed, and moved around on a daily basis. The value of information has skyrocketed, and information has all of a sudden become a valuable asset for individuals, businesses, and nations. The security of nations has come to depend on computer networks that very few can defend effectively. Our own individual privacy and security have come to depend on the whims of the kid next door.
Joseph Migga Kizza

The Emergence of the Digital and Social Network Ecosystem

Frontmatter

23. Mobile Systems and Corresponding Intractable Security Issues

Abstract
In the previous two chapters, 18 and 19, we dealt with wireless communication but restricted our discussion to sensor networks, wireless communication networks, and cellular networks. We discussed a good number of communication devices and their communication protocols. We also discussed the security problems and we propose solutions in some cases. What we did not do is actually put all these devices and technologies together to create the current phenomenal mobile communication devices, and the technology is currently driving computing and communication. We are going to do this in this chapter and more. The last two decades have witnessed a revolution of sorts in communication spearheaded by the rapidly evolving technologies in both software and hardware. A mobile communication system consists of two or more of the following devices, running specifically developed software to sustain, for a period of time, a wireless communication link between them: mobile telephone, broadly construed here to include devices based on code division multiple access (CDMA), time division multiple access (TDMA), Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM), and wireless personal digital assistant (WPDA) digital technologies and follow-ons, as well as satellite telephones and e-mail appliances. Mobile communication systems are revolutionizing the world today, shrinking the world to between two or more small handheld mobile devices. The rapid changes in communication technologies, the revolutionary changes in software, and the growth of large powerful communication network technologies all have eased communication and brought it to large swaths of the globe. The high-end competition between the mobile telecommunication operators resulting in plummeting device prices, the quickly developing smartphone technology, and the growing number of undersea cables and cheaper satellite technologies are bringing Internet access to almost every one of the global rural poor faster than many had anticipated.
Joseph Migga Kizza

Securing the Last Frontiers – The Home Front

Frontmatter

25. Conquering the Last Frontier in the Digital Invasion: The Home Front

Abstract
As digital technology conquers new territory and there is ubiquitous use of technology, the last frontier has fallen in the digital invasion and the digital activity hub has come home. It is almost a paradox that as more technological activities have come home to make the lives of millions of people easier and more enjoyable, the threat to their core personal security is directly under attack. Since the early 1950s as digital technology become pervious, the main activity and locus of technological activities invaded the workplace first as the need for improvement in production become paramount. Millions of people took on the task of learning the new technologies as a way to prevent job losses as these new technologies entered the workplace to improve production and hence improve profitability. There were cries of “computers invading the workplace and eating jobs.” After a while, we all got used to these new invaders and we became comfortable to work with the job skills they provided. Production skyrocketed and new jobs were created as old olds disappeared and the fear of job losses was overcome and confidence increased among young workers as they entered the workplace with ever-increasing new skills promising enormous fortunes. We saw new technology giants springing up every other day and making millions. With little fanfare and unknowingly, we become members of social networks as we linked up with colleagues and relatives and a million other people we never and we will never know.
Joseph Migga Kizza

Hands-On Projects

Frontmatter

26. Projects

Abstract
This is a special chapter dealing with security projects. We have arranged the projects in four parts. Part 1 consists of current case study projects from two successful National Science Foundation (NSF) funded workshops at the authors university. Part 2 consists of projects that can be done on a weekly or biweekly basis. Part 3 consists of projects that can be done in a group or individually on a semi-semester or on a semester basis. Projects in Part 4 may demand a great deal of work and may require extensive research to be done. Some of the projects in this part may fulfill a master’s or even Ph.D. degree project requirements. We have tried as much as possible throughout these projects to encourage instructors and students to use open source as much as possible. This will decouple the content of the Guide from the rapidly changing proprietary software market.
Joseph Migga Kizza
Additional information