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About this book

This core text book takes social policy back to its basics. Concise, accessible and engaging, each chapter is structured around a key question, such as ‘What Is Social Policy And Why Is It Relevant To You?’, ‘Do You Pay Too Much Tax For The Social Policy Benefits You Receive?’ Or ‘Can Social Policy Solve The Problem Of Poverty?’. It breaks the subject down to make it more understandable and relatable to real life so students understand the theory that underpins social policy but also what it actually means in practice.

This is essential reading for students taking an introductory Social Policy module as part of a Social Policy or Social Work degree programme, and anyone else wanting a straight forward guide to connecting the theory with people’s lives.

Table of Contents

1. What Is Social Policy and Why Is It Relevant to You?

Abstract
The aims of this chapter are to:
1.
Outline the everyday relevance of social policy to you
 
2.
Discuss what the study of social policy involves
 
3.
Detail the areas and issues which will be covered in this book
 
Clive Sealey

2. Which Benefits Do You Receive from Social Policy, and Who Receives the Most Benefits?

Abstract
The aims of this chapter are to:
1.
Outline the different types of benefits that social policy provides
 
2.
Consider which benefits you receive from social policy
 
3.
Analyse which groups receive the most benefits from social policy
 
Clive Sealey

3. How and Why Has Social Policy Developed Cradle to Grave Entitlement to Benefits for You?

Abstract
The aims of this chapter are to:
1.
Provide a simplified historical account of why your entitlement to ‘cradle to grave’ social policy exists at all
 
2.
Outline important historical lessons from social policy past for social policy today
 
Clive Sealey

4. Do You Pay too much Tax for the Social Policy Benefits You Receive?

Abstract
The aims of this chapter are to:
1.
Provide an outline of how much tax you pay
 
2.
Detail the way that tax pays for social policy
 
3.
Compare how much tax you pay with how the cost of the social policy benefits you receive
 
4.
Outline important social policy principles related to taxation funded social policy
 
Clive Sealey

5. Can Social Policy Solve the Problem of Poverty?

Abstract
The aims of this chapter are to:
1.
Outline the two main ways that poverty is defined, and discuss the strengths and limitations of these two definitions of poverty
 
2.
Detail the official poverty line in the UK, and how it is measured
 
3.
Analyse the number of people who live in poverty in the UK, and the main categories of people living in poverty
 
4.
Discuss the two main reasons why people are in poverty
 
Clive Sealey

6. Should Entitlement to Social Policy Benefits Be just for Some People or for Everyone?

Abstract
The aims of this chapter are to:
1.
Outline the differences between selective and universal entitlement to social policies
 
2.
Compare and contrast the advantages and disadvantages of universal and selective social policies
 
3.
Analyse whether universal or selective social policies provides the most effective social policy outcomes
 
4.
Analyse whether recent changes in social policies are universal or selective in nature
 
Clive Sealey

7. Which Welfare Needs Should Social Policy Be Responsible for Meeting?

Abstract
The aims of this chapter are to:
  • Outline the two main types of welfare needs that exist
  • Detail how and why these different types of welfare lead to different social policies
  • Highlight how current social policy is focussed on meeting needs, and the implications of this current focus for the effectiveness of social policy
Clive Sealey

8. Who Should Provide Social Policies?

Abstract
The aims of this chapter are to:
1.
Outline differences between social policies provided by the state, private companies, voluntary/community organizations and individuals
 
2.
Outline the specified advantages and limitations of these different ways of providing social policies
 
3.
Understand the notion and the significance of the shift to a mixed economy of welfare for current social policies
 
Clive Sealey

9. What Does the Future Hold for Social Policy?

Abstract
The aims of this chapter are to:
1.
Outline the major social and economic changes that have happened in society since the development of the post-war ‘Welfare State’
 
2.
Discuss how these changes are affecting social policy now, and how they will possible affect social policy in the future
 
3.
Detail important social policies that have been put in place to deal with these changes
 
Clive Sealey

10. How Can Your Ideological Beliefs Make and Change Social Policy?

Abstract
The aims of this chapter are to:
1.
Provide a basic understanding of the two main ideological beliefs of social policies past, present and future
 
2.
Enable you to locate and understand your own ideological beliefs about key aspects of social policies
 
3.
Detail how your ideological beliefs can make and change social policy
 
Clive Sealey

11. Is Relying on Social Policy Benefits over a Long Time an Easy Life?

Abstract
The aims of this chapter are to:
1.
Provide a detailed everyday account of the reality of being reliant on social policy benefits
 
2.
Compare and contrast the negative and beneficial outcomes of being reliant on social policy benefits
 
Simon Heng

12. Why Is Studying Social Policy Relevant to You?

Abstract
The main aim of this book has been to outline the real life significance of social policy to you, your family, friends and the community you live in. It has attempted to do this principally by continually detailing how the study of social policy is relevant to your everyday real life. If you have read the book throughout, this real life relevance of studying social policy is hopefully the one thing that has become the most apparent and interesting aspect of finding out what is social policy.
Clive Sealey
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