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About this book

Supervision has been a major component of initial training and an important element for professional development in the very wide field of Mental Healthcare. Part of the Foundation of Mental Health Practice series, this new book guides the student through the supervision process and enables them to get the most out of it and improve their practice.

Table of Contents

1. An Introduction to Supervision

Abstract
You are probably reading this book as an introduction to the very wide arena of what is termed supervision. You have made a good start for your journey. We aim to provide readers with relevant and significant key information on how to get the most out of supervision.
Paul Cassedy, Maureen Anderson

2. Understanding the Functions of Supervision

Abstract
A conceptual model for supervision [Proctor 2001] was introduced in chapter 1. This model emerged from the work and experience that she, along with other colleagues, had developed in training and consultancy within counselling and related settings. It is perhaps the most commonly used model, certainly within health care settings and in the United Kingdom and is widely considered in literature and training However, most of the literature and explanations of the model have the supervisor in mind, as a practical framework for training supervisors and for policyholders who are implementing supervisor. In this chapter, we are going to explore and consider the model and its tasks in relation to you the supervisee and what will be valuable to understand, in relation to your learning and development in making the most out of supervision. Proctor [2001] refers to this concept as a supervision alliance model. It is important the word alliance is referred to, as supervision needs to be an agreement with all parties concerned, a mutual benefit for all concerned and have similar aims and purpose. Think of these as aims, or perhaps rather the foci or tasks of supervision, as overlapping and integrating functions for the purpose of supervision.
Paul Cassedy, Maureen Anderson

3. What to Cover and Prepare for in the First Meeting

Abstract
A first session with a supervisor is crucial as it will not only set the tone but also determine how things are going to proceed. It is also about getting to know each other and establishing trust in the relationship. It is important to recognise that although it is primarily up to the supervisor to provide and establish the supervisory alliance, the foundation of which should be trustworthiness. Building of trust takes time and your feelings of trustworthiness in your supervisor may be determined by how open and authentic they are with you. This may be evident in their attitude and facilitation style. However, you have a large part to play as well, in enabling the relationship to develop and grow. In this chapter, we will look at some of the responsibilities and tasks you have, to make that happen.
Paul Cassedy, Maureen Anderson

4. An Introduction to Reflective Practice

Abstrcat
This chapter will focus on the importance of reflective practice. Supervision is recognised as a forum for reflective practice and how it is associated with improved quality of care, stimulating personal and professional growth and hence closing the gap between theory and practice. Students of mental health need to continue their growth and development, as there is an ever-changing context of health care, which will place demands on expertise.
Paul Cassedy, Maureen Anderson

5. Group Supervision

Abstract
We will begin this chapter by clarifying what group clinical supervision is. Bond and Holland [2010] offer a simple definition that a group is “three or more people who come together and interrelate cooperatively with each other towards their common purpose [P 210] The context or that common purpose being clinical supervision. However, there may be misunderstandings that need clarifying, as with the similar roles that may serve some of the functions of individual supervision that we considered in chapter 1. For example, groups such as a debriefing session following a traumatic incident to offer support and any further guidance. Alternatively, a group that meets for support while sharing information, offering updates on organisational issues and sharing current topics of concern on professional matters. Although there may be significant interaction and interrelating between those attending, the function is not as we are defining as group supervision. There are probably several other types of group meetings, for example, action learning sets, case conferences, research groups, journal clubs . They may be ad hoc or meet at regular intervals, have different members attending. They may indeed serve some of the functions of group supervision some of the time, for example support and learning, but not all of the functions of supervision, all of the time.
Paul Cassedy, Maureen Anderson

6. Supervision Anxiety

Abstrcat
In this chapter anxieties for the supervisee in supervision will be considered and explored with how they may be overcome to make for effective supervision. Back in 1985 Alonso referred to supervision as a complicated hall of mirrors, one such mirror and one that is often not looked into is power dynamics, and the impact of shame. We begin to address this here to help you become aware of some of the unspoken issues that may arise due to perceived imbalances within the supervisory relationship.
Paul Cassedy, Maureen Anderson

7. Creative Supervision

Abstract
In this chapter we want to show how creative supervision can be helpful for mental health workers. The techniques and methods used here are not only examples of what could take place in supervision but may also be applicable for you to develop with certain clients, where suitable, along with all the appropriate support, guidance and supervision that would be required in your organisational setting.
It may be that your present supervisor is experienced and knowledgeable, working in a creative style, so some of the methods found in this chapter will be familiar. However, if your supervisor is not used to this style of supervision, then perhaps it is something you could suggest, and both become more familiar with . Children are naturally creative, with spontaneous and curious experimentation in their play and exploration. However, receiving negative, dismissive or no response at all actions from authority figures, can leave its traces as we mature into a grown- Those early experiences may make you both, in supervision, reluctant to use creativity as a method of reflection and inquiry, it can trigger memories of embarrassment, or feeling you could do better from the negative feedback you received . Using creativity in supervision is not about artistic skill, it is more the ability to be use imagination and to be spontaneous
Paul Cassedy, Maureen Anderson

8. Ethical Principles in Supervision Relationships, for Good Practice

Abstract
There is only scope in this chapter to offer a brief consideration of some of the ethical and professional issues which are relevant to supervision practice and your role as a mental health worker. An introduction to ethical principles, alongside your organisations or governing bodies relevant codes of practice, will begin to provide you with the means to make ethical judgements and explore the reasoning that supports those judgements . The understanding of these principles will provide the reasoning for the codes of conduct, as this becomes the relationship between ethics and professionalism.
Paul Cassedy, Maureen Anderson
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