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About this book

The third edition of this textbook has been thoroughly revised to meet the needs of today's social work students, professionals and service managers. It illustrates current legislation, policy, procedure and concerns, with additional material included to develop readers' confidence and skills in the context of learning organisations.
This book is essential reading for students and practitioners alike, particularly those who need to understand organisation and management theory for study purposes and those who aspire to move into social work management or have been recent promoted.

Table of Contents

Introduction

Abstract
Since it was first published in 1990, this book has made an immeasurable contribution to the understanding and practice of management in social work. The second edition came out as the management and performance revolution was beginning to take hold in social service agencies, whilst our work on this third edition has taken place against a competing background of a continuing central government ‘modernisation’ agenda, on the one hand, and the tackling of complexity by postmodernist theory, on the other. Expanding the editorial team for this third edition, we retain the same commitment to improving standards as was evident in Veronica Coulshed’s original text and continue to share her firm belief that good management plays a crucial role in achieving such progress.
Audrey Mullender, David Jones, Neil Thompson

1. Why study management?

Abstract
This chapter outlines why it is useful for social workers at every level to know something of the discipline called ‘management’. It asserts that all social workers are managers of a kind and debates whether, to look at this the other way round, all managers in social work organisations should have a background in social work practice. Regardless of one’s views on this question, it does have to be accepted that today’s managers employ not only many skills which are transferable from practice but also others peculiar to the management world, in scope if not always in detail.
Veronica Coulshed, Audrey Mullender, David N. Jones, Neil Thompson

2. Management theory and organisational structures

Abstract
In this chapter, we examine some of the best known approaches to management, the structure of organisations, and the thinking that both shapes people’s behaviour and is shaped by it. Starting from the classical theories of management, we look at: scientific managerialism, which tends to treat employees like cogs in a machine; the human relations school of management theory which added people into the equation; and the study of organisational structures, particularly bureaucratic hierarchies and organisations as systems, because these models will be most familiar to social workers. (Later chapters will consider the culture of excellence, with its emphasis on quality, and other current trends, including reward management.)
Veronica Coulshed, Audrey Mullender, David N. Jones, Neil Thompson

3. Cultural change and quality standards

Abstract
As we saw in Chapter 2, management and organisational theory moved from abstract model-building to understanding the workforce as human beings rather than as cogs in a machine. Paradoxically, organisations can become more efficient if, instead of trying to tidy the people in them into neat little pigeonholes and control their every action, human needs are responded to and human strengths — creativity, enthusiasm, engagement — are fostered. In social work, as elsewhere, this has to happen in a context of constant change which can create enormous uncertainty and even hostility. This means there is quite a challenge facing the managers who must provide the leadership to motivate staff under difficult circumstances and manage the process of change.
Veronica Coulshed, Audrey Mullender, David N. Jones, Neil Thompson

4. Management as vision, strategy and leadership, or management of uncertainty?

Abstract
Although providing leadership is only one aspect of what the top manager does, it is the most visible — particularly when it is lacking. In the view of the project director for the Audit Commission/Social Services Inspectorate Joint Reviews: ‘Where authorities are failing, it’s usually down to a lack of a clear steer and grip on the organisation by management and a lack of accountability’ (Hirst, 1998, p. 8). He also relates this to the overall culture of an organisation, as we did in Chapter 3. In a later report, the Joint Review Team interviewed directors in departments that had implemented successful changes and was ‘struck by how often questions about the critical success factors led directors to reflect not only on their actions, but also on their style and approach’ (DoH/SSI and the Audit Commission, 2002). Consequently, leadership is often seen as a key element of management. To show how it relates to the whole organisation, we link it to vision and strategy and go on to comment on leadership roles and styles.
Veronica Coulshed, Audrey Mullender, David N. Jones, Neil Thompson

5. Matching people and jobs

Abstract
Nowhere is the tendency towards tighter management in contemporary social work more in evidence than in recruitment and selection. Consequently, this whole chapter owes as much to texts from human resource management (McKenna and Beech, 1995; Torrington and Hall, 1998), as to social work sources or the authors’ own experience of appointing staff.
Veronica Coulshed, Audrey Mullender, David N. Jones, Neil Thompson

6. The human resource: meeting the needs of staff

Abstract
The largest element of the budget in human service organisations is spent on salaries: the ‘human resource’ — a huge step forward from the early ‘cogs in a machine’ thinking noted in Chapter 2.
Veronica Coulshed, Audrey Mullender, David N. Jones, Neil Thompson

7. Managing diversity

Abstract
With over 80 per cent of the social services workforce made up of women (Balloch et al., 1995), disability legislation catching up with sex and race discrimination and recent major strides in recruiting black students and staff, not to mention all the attention focused on anti-oppressive practice, we might like to think of social work organisations as being well ahead in terms of equality and diversity. A closer look, however, reveals that, despite advances, there is still a long way to go.
Veronica Coulshed, Audrey Mullender, David N. Jones, Neil Thompson

8. Conclusion

Abstract
So what of the future? Can the tremendous pace of change that has marked recent years in social work be sustained or will we enter a period of consolidation? There is certainly no sign at present of things standing still.
Veronica Coulshed, Audrey Mullender, David N. Jones, Neil Thompson
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