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About this book

Written by a leading author, this text provides a much needed account of UK public health and well-being policies and considers their influence on practice. With an emphasis on the importance of inter-agency and inter-professional approaches, this text is vital reading for all students and practitioners of public health and well-being.

Table of Contents

1. Partnerships for public health and well-being

Abstract
The purpose of this book is to explore partnerships in the field of public health and well-being. Its central focus is upon the establishment of partnerships, their rationale, practices, relationships, the problems they face, and how these can be understood and addressed. This chapter is in three parts. First, there is an examination of the rationale for partnerships in the context of public health and well-being. Second, an analysis of the historical context of partnership in this field is undertaken, which identifies key themes to be explored in later chapters. Third, key concepts and frameworks relating to the analysis of partnership and collaborative working are explored.
Rob Baggott

2. Partnerships at the global and international level

Abstract
Global and international factors have provided a rationale for public health partnerships and have yielded important lessons for partnership working. Three key aspects are considered in this chapter. First are the global aspects of partnership, including initiatives undertaken by bodies such as the World Health Organization (WHO), and the processes that link global institutions and organizations. Second are the activities of European bodies, such as European Union (EU) institutions and the WHO European Regional Office. Third are the experiences of particular countries in establishing and developing partnership arrangements.
Rob Baggott

3. Partnerships under New Labour

Abstract
As noted in Chapter 1, the New Labour governments placed great emphasis on partnership working, with the aim of promoting ‘joined-up government’. However, partnerships tended to evolve rather than being shaped by a clear blueprint. Indeed, with regard to partnerships on healt and well-being, the policy was essentially an accumulation of several policy streams. First, central government policies on public health, including White Papers and related structural and procedural changes, identified coordination and partnership as a means of achieving objective in this field. Second, specific public health problems were identified as needing a collaborative approach. Third, health programmes and schemes were introduced that included partnership as a key element. Fourth, policies on the relationship between the NHS and social care had important implications for other partnerships. Fifth, a range of wider policies in the NHS and local government, as well as specific programm and performance management processes, promoted partnership working Sixth, policies emerging in other policy sectors encouraged partnership working with health bodies. This chapter explores these various factors and how they shaped the development of partnerships in health and well-being. It also explores the impact of these policies on partnership working in practice.
Rob Baggott

4. Partnerships and the Coalition government

Abstract
This chapter examines the main changes and continuities in public health policy since 2010, under the Conservative-Liberal Democrat Coalition government led by David Cameron, and their impact on partnership working. After outlining the main features of the Coalition’s reforms, the chapter focuses on the role of new local partnership bodies, Health and Wellbeing Boards. The chapter also features an analysis of multidisciplinary and interprofessional working, an important aspect of partnership working that is being addressed by the Coalition (and which has also been considered by previous governments).
Rob Baggott

5. Partnerships with the community and citizens

Abstract
An increasingly important dimension of partnership working is engagement with communities and citizens. This chapter explores this aspect of partnerships in some detail. It begins by analysing community participation as a basis for partnership and its potential to address public health challenges. Policy initiatives to extend and improve community participation and partnership are then examined, including reforms of the public involvement system in the NHS, other relevant participation initiatives and community development approaches. The primary focus again is upon England, although the experiences of Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland are also examined (see Box 5.3).
Rob Baggott

6. Partnerships with the voluntary sector

Abstract
The voluntary sector has been identified as vital in securing greater community involvement in health and well-being, and improving public services in this field. This chapter explores key policy developments affecting the voluntary sector and the implications for partnership working in health and well-being. It begins with a discussion of the nature of the voluntary sector in general, including a brief historical context, key concepts and definitions, and indicators of its size and scope. This is followed by an analysis of the policies adopted by previous and current governments towards the sector. The next section considers in more detail the role of voluntary organizations in health. Again the main focus is upon England, although important similarities and differences with Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland are discussed (see Box 6.1).
Rob Baggott

7. Partnerships with the private sector

Abstract
Increasingly, the private sector (businesses, commercial organizations and for-profit organizations) is seen as an important partner in public health and well-being. This chapter explores the role of the private sector in some depth. It begins by discussing the potential for involving business in partnerships to improve health and well-being. This is followed by a discussion of the drawbacks and problems of private sector involvement. The next section focuses on the role of the private sector in health partnerships at global level. This is followed by a review of recent national policies on the private sector and public health in the UK, including the Coalition government’s Responsibility Deal. Finally, some examples of local partnership working with the private sector are discussed. The chapter also considers the role of social enterprises in health and well-being (see Box 7.1).
Rob Baggott

8. Conclusion

Abstract
This book has shown that partnership has become a key instrument of public health and well-being. Public health is in essence a collective enterprise that requires the cooperation and collaboration of public and private sector bodies, the voluntary sector and citizens. Efforts to promote and protect public health and increase individual and social well-being will ultimately fall short if they do not foster strong mutual and reciprocal relationships. This principle is reflected in modern public health perspectives, which place great emphasis on multisectoral action and engagement with civil society (including voluntary and private sector bodies), and on the need to ensure that health and well-being are appropriately reflected in all areas of public policy.
Rob Baggott
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