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About this book

Across the range of social care, health and welfare professions, it is essential that students and practitioners engage meaningfully with the communities and service users they work with. This book offers a timely and practical guide to the methods and skills related to forming and developing such partnerships.

Helping both aspiring and experienced practitioners to empower communities and service users, this book:

• Explores how the developing roles of communities and service users influence policy, services and practice.

• Highlights the different ethical, power and boundary tensions when working with communities and service users and suggests ways to overcome them.

• Provides examples, case studies, activities and useful resources which help illustrate ways and methods of empowering people and enabling their voices to be heard.

An accessible and wide-ranging book, Engaging Communities and Service Users is a must have text for students and practitioners in social care, health and welfare.

Table of Contents

Context

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Introducing Concepts and Meanings

Abstract
By the end of this chapter you should have an understanding of:
  • some of the key terminology and theoretical models that can help us to understand and analyse approaches to participation and engagement;
  • some of the developments in thinking that have influenced approaches to engaging with communities and service users;
  • some of the critiques and analyses that highlight the contested themes covered later in this book;
  • useful resources to improve knowledge and practice;
  • guidance on how to make effective use of this book.
Billie Oliver, Bob Pitt

Chapter 2. The Policy Context

Abstract
By the end of this chapter you should have an understanding of:
  • some of the UK policy initiatives that encourage engagement with communities and service users;
  • why participation and involvement are considered important by policymakers and government;
  • two models of participation — consumerist and democratic models — whereby service users and communities influence policy;
  • policy changes and continuities in the UK from the 1990s presented under themes of vision, empowerment, participation and partnership;
  • examples of practice emerging in response to policies; and
  • policy development reflecting service user involvement including the personalisation agenda viewed from different political contexts.
Billie Oliver, Bob Pitt

Themes

Frontmatter

Chapter 3. Encouraging Association

Abstract
By the end of this chapter you should have an understanding of:
  • relational approaches to understanding community and association;
  • theoretical concepts such as social capital and civil society;
  • the contested territory of policy approaches to encouraging voluntary association; and
  • useful resources to improve knowledge and practice.
Billie Oliver, Bob Pitt

Chapter 4. Activating Citizenship

Abstract
By the end of this chapter you should have an understanding of:
  • the concept of citizenship within current UK, European and global perspectives;
  • the historical development of ideas on citizenship with a particular focus on the UK;
  • citizenship in relation to rights, duties, identity and participation at both national and international levels;
  • citizenship as both status and practice;
  • the distinction between the ‘good’ and ‘active’ citizen;
  • ideas and practice for activating citizenship.
Billie Oliver, Bob Pitt

Chapter 5. Releasing Capacity

Abstract
By the end of this chapter you should have an understanding of:
  • a range of meanings and approaches associated with community capacity building;
  • some guiding principles for working with people and communities to release their capacity for self-determination;
  • some of the opportunities, challenges and tensions in the community development approach;
  • useful resources to improve knowledge and practice.
Billie Oliver, Bob Pitt

Chapter 6. Exploring Boundaries

Abstract
By the end of this chapter you should have an understanding of:
  • a range of professional boundary issues when working with communities and service users;
  • the nature of dual relationships;
  • the impact on professional identities of working in communities with service users;
  • how to manage ethical and power issues in relation to working with communities and service users.
Billie Oliver, Bob Pitt

Methods

Frontmatter

Chapter 7. Supporting Engagement through Advocacy and Mentoring

Abstract
By the end of this chapter you should have an understanding of:
  • contexts, aims and purposes to engaging service users and communities through advocacy and mentoring;
  • definitions and a range of forms of advocacy and mentoring;
  • critiques of models of practice in relation to advocacy and mentoring;
  • the impact of advocacy and mentoring on individuals and communities;
  • examples of initiatives in relation to advocacy and mentoring.
Billie Oliver, Bob Pitt

Chapter 8. Learning through Conversations

Abstract
By the end of this chapter you should have an understanding of:
  • approaches to working with service users through informal education;
  • the theory and practice of social pedagogy;
  • an insight into debates in relation to conversation and dialogue;
  • useful resources to improve knowledge and practice.
Billie Oliver, Bob Pitt

Chapter 9. Evaluating Engagement and Participation

Abstract
By the end of this chapter you should have an understanding of:
  • the meaning of ‘evaluation’ that distinguishes it from ‘research’;
  • why we evaluate;
  • recent policy context introducing some principles behind the provision of services and the importance of evaluation;
  • models and methods of evaluation, including critiques of different approaches;
  • examples where communities and service users get involved in evaluation, research and the co-production of knowledge.
Billie Oliver, Bob Pitt

Conclusio

Frontmatter

Chapter 10. Emergent Landscapes

Abstract
By the end of this chapter you should have an understanding of:
  • emergent themes in the policy and practice of community and service user involvement;
  • active approaches to engagement and participation;
  • the significance of the concept of space in determining where engagement and participation happens and who is involved;
  • principles that will help you to critically evaluate your own practice when working with service users and communities.
Billie Oliver, Bob Pitt
Additional information