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About this book

With an emphasis on promoting self-reliance, autonomy and independence, this exciting new book provides a contemporary and holistic analysis of the childhood resilience. It recognises 'resilience in childhood' as a complex construct, critically deconstructs it by drawing upon a wide range of academic disciplines and practices, and provides an account of the factors that help and hinder the development of resilience during childhood and adolescence.

Part I unpacks definitions of resilience and its "construction" over the last 50 years. Part II examines psychological, sociological and neurobiological perspectives that contribute to our understanding of how childhood resilience can be developed and fostered. Part III explores strategies and approaches relating theory to current intervention practice and policy drivers. Application to professional practice within a multi-agency context is explored throughout.

Importantly, this book seeks to develop the notion of 'the promise of resilience' and establish the bond between capabilities built up in childhood and the promise of a positive successful future. Efforts to foster and build effective skills that lead to resilience will result in long-lasting abilities to positively navigate through life's challenges and to become the key architect of one's own success in later life.

Table of Contents

Resilience: The Construct

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Resilience — An Introduction

Abstract
‘Resilience’ is a word that one hears often but which often seems to defy a precise definition. In the context of this text, ‘resilience’ encompasses psychology, sociology and child and adolescent development to describe children and young people who flourish despite what can objectively be described as very difficult circumstances.
Erica Joslyn

Chapter 2. Resilience: Research & Development

Abstract
Decades of research and thinking in this field have contributed to our understanding of the nature and development of resilience. Although the formal study of resilience as a discrete subject of research is relatively new, it has its origins in earlier multidisciplinary investigations.
Erica Joslyn

Key Perspectives

Frontmatter

Chapter 3. Building Blocks from Psychology

Abstract
In this chapter, we explore the importance of psychological health and wellness in early childhood and adolescence, as well as a range of psychological factors that influence how children and young people can and should develop the attributes and characteristics of resilience. We start with the very earliest days of individuals’ lives and explore how their first forays into relationships with the important people in their lives can lay the foundations for well-being later on.
Erica Joslyn

Chapter 4. A Social Neurobiological Perspective

Abstract
Over the last decade, there has been a significant level of interest in identifying adaptive and coping mechanisms that support and foster the development of resilience. The study of resilience in childhood has more recently been extended to the study of the human brain to determine the brain structures and circuits that impact on and influence behaviour generally and, more specifically, the development of resilience.
Erica Joslyn

Chapter 5. Significance of Ecological Environments

Abstract
Of course, young people’s lives are not just lived in the context of a small, intimate circle of family members and caregivers. From infancy, they have to learn how to be within the context of broader society, which is a realm rich in both risk and opportunity in terms of resilience.
Erica Joslyn

Promise and Practice

Frontmatter

Chapter 6. Routes to Resilience

Abstract
Various strategies for building resilience have been proposed based on perceptions about how personalities, skills, competence and ability can be influenced, shaped and honed. What is common across most of these strategies is the acceptance that building resilience is not a single event. Rather, it relies on a capacity for effective responses to complex situational and structural factors over a sustained period of time.
Erica Joslyn

Chapter 7. Resilience — Early Years Care and Education

Abstract
From birth and throughout the early years, young children begin the process of learning about the world and their place in it. They start to become social creatures who learn how to understand themselves in the context of a growing series of relationships with other people and how they can communicate their thoughts and ideas to others. They learn about where they stand in relation to the other people in their lives and how the things they do impact on both their own experience and that of others. They begin to understand that the actions they take have social consequences and that they can initiate or engage in social contact with the people they meet. By experimenting, making mistakes and learning from them, they have embarked on the educational process that will take them through childhood and adolescence and into adulthood — and that, to some extent, will continue for the rest of their lives.
Erica Joslyn

Chapter 8. Educational Resilience in Schools

Abstract
The provision of formal education for children during the key stages of their development is integral to modern society and has become a cornerstone of how knowledge and skills are passed on to the next generation of citizens. With the exception of the small numbers of children who are home schooled, most young people around the world, and certainly in the developed world, are expected to attend compulsory education up until they are at least 17 years of age.
Erica Joslyn

Chapter 9. The Promise of Resilience

Abstract
People of every generation face challenges to resilience, and current generations are no exception. No matter how much society changes and evolves, there will always be difficulties to confront, and some people will suffer more setbacks than others. Many societies have already recognised the huge gains to be made from investing in programmes such as social welfare and socialised medicine, and great progress has been made. For the twenty-first century, fostering resilience, for today and for the future, is a specific challenge facing each generation, not least because each individual person has a unique personal narrative with its own opportunities and challenges.
Erica Joslyn
Additional information