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About this book

This handy guide helps science students to develop essential skills for success in their discipline. Featuring top tips, memorable illustrations and real scientific examples, it shows them how to record their observations accurately, interpret their results accurately and develop good time management skills and study habits. It also contains practical guidance on tackling different types of assignments, responding to feedback and preparing for exams.

This is an invaluable resource for science students on both further and higher education courses.

Table of Contents

1. Doing science

Abstract
To do this you must refer to the body of knowledge that we already have, so you’re standing on the shoulders of scientists who have gone before you as you reach for the sky. This means that you read textbooks to get the overall picture and learn the language of science, which has differing dialects for the different disciplines. Then, as you become more knowledgeable and specialised in a particular area, you will need to probe deeply into current thinking, searching through journals for academic papers because that is how front-line scientists publish their work.
Sue Robbins

2. Reporting science

Abstract
To do this you must refer to the body of knowledge that we already have, so you’re standing on the shoulders of scientists who have gone before you as you reach for the sky. This means that you read textbooks to get the overall picture and learn the language of science, which has differing dialects for the different disciplines. Then, as you become more knowledgeable and specialised in a particular area, you will need to probe deeply into current thinking, searching through journals for academic papers because that is how front-line scientists publish their work.
Sue Robbins

3. Reading effectively

Abstract
To do this you must refer to the body of knowledge that we already have, so you’re standing on the shoulders of scientists who have gone before you as you reach for the sky. This means that you read textbooks to get the overall picture and learn the language of science, which has differing dialects for the different disciplines. Then, as you become more knowledgeable and specialised in a particular area, you will need to probe deeply into current thinking, searching through journals for academic papers because that is how front-line scientists publish their work.
Sue Robbins

4. Essays in science

Abstract
To do this you must refer to the body of knowledge that we already have, so you’re standing on the shoulders of scientists who have gone before you as you reach for the sky. This means that you read textbooks to get the overall picture and learn the language of science, which has differing dialects for the different disciplines. Then, as you become more knowledgeable and specialised in a particular area, you will need to probe deeply into current thinking, searching through journals for academic papers because that is how front-line scientists publish their work.
Sue Robbins

5. Academic posters

Abstract
To do this you must refer to the body of knowledge that we already have, so you’re standing on the shoulders of scientists who have gone before you as you reach for the sky. This means that you read textbooks to get the overall picture and learn the language of science, which has differing dialects for the different disciplines. Then, as you become more knowledgeable and specialised in a particular area, you will need to probe deeply into current thinking, searching through journals for academic papers because that is how front-line scientists publish their work.
Sue Robbins

6. Science project work

Abstract
To do this you must refer to the body of knowledge that we already have, so you’re standing on the shoulders of scientists who have gone before you as you reach for the sky. This means that you read textbooks to get the overall picture and learn the language of science, which has differing dialects for the different disciplines. Then, as you become more knowledgeable and specialised in a particular area, you will need to probe deeply into current thinking, searching through journals for academic papers because that is how front-line scientists publish their work.
Sue Robbins

7. Understanding and using feedback

Abstract
To do this you must refer to the body of knowledge that we already have, so you’re standing on the shoulders of scientists who have gone before you as you reach for the sky. This means that you read textbooks to get the overall picture and learn the language of science, which has differing dialects for the different disciplines. Then, as you become more knowledgeable and specialised in a particular area, you will need to probe deeply into current thinking, searching through journals for academic papers because that is how front-line scientists publish their work.
Sue Robbins

8. Tackling science exams

Abstract
To do this you must refer to the body of knowledge that we already have, so you’re standing on the shoulders of scientists who have gone before you as you reach for the sky. This means that you read textbooks to get the overall picture and learn the language of science, which has differing dialects for the different disciplines. Then, as you become more knowledgeable and specialised in a particular area, you will need to probe deeply into current thinking, searching through journals for academic papers because that is how front-line scientists publish their work.
Sue Robbins
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