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About this book

Studying Law introduces students to the fundamental legal skills that they will need to successfully study the subject, such as case analysis, legislative interpretation, problem solving and essay writing, and to the core Law subjects themselves and the distinctions between them.

Table of Contents

1. Studying Law: What’s It All About?

Abstract
The best way to approach the academic study of anything is to ask: what is this subject about? This question may be important for two reasons.
Simon Askey, Ian McLeod

2. The Sources of English Law

Abstract
For all practical purposes, the sources of English law are the common law, statute law and delegated legislation, and European Union law.
Simon Askey, Ian McLeod

3. The Constitutional Context of English Law

Abstract
In this chapter we will pick up and develop the point (which we introduced briefl y at p. 2) that constitutional law is concerned with the allocation of public (or governmental) power between different institutions and people.
Simon Askey, Ian McLeod

4. The Jurisdictions of the Principal Courts

Abstract
In order to understand some of the material in this book, you will need also to understand, at least in outline, the jurisdictions of the principal English courts as well as the EU’s courts and the European Court of Human Rights.
Simon Askey, Ian McLeod

5. The Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms

Abstract
This chapter considers the way in which English law protects, or fails to protect, human rights and fundamental freedoms (a phrase which is usually abbreviated simply to human rights).
Simon Askey, Ian McLeod

6. Finding and Citing the Sources of Law

Abstract
As a student, you will have to consult many books, journals, law reports, statutes and European materials in order to fi nd the law.
Simon Askey, Ian McLeod

7. Legal Method

Abstract
Phrases such as legal method and legal reasoning are often used as labels for the ways in which lawyers think and argue.
Simon Askey, Ian McLeod

8. Reading Law Reports and Statutes

Abstract
We noted in Chapter 2 that the English legal system is a common law system, which means that a great deal of the law has been created, and some of it continues to be developed, by the courts when deciding individual cases.
Simon Askey, Ian McLeod

9. Written English

Abstract
Written English can be used in a wide variety of contexts, with equally widely varying degrees of formality.
Simon Askey, Ian McLeod

10. Answering Essay Questions

Abstract
Writing, like speech, is a form of communication, an attempt to convey meaning.
Simon Askey, Ian McLeod

11. Answering Problem Questions

Abstract
Although many people accept the truth of the saying that knowledge is power, the reality of the matter is a great deal less clear-cut.
Simon Askey, Ian McLeod

12. Oral Skills

Abstract
Your career as a student is likely to give you many opportunities for participating in oral presentations, some of which may well count for assessment.
Simon Askey, Ian McLeod
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