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About this book

Become a Blockchain developer and design, build, publish, test, maintain and secure scalable decentralized Blockchain projects using Bitcoin, Ethereum, NEO, EOS and Hyperledger.

This book helps you understand Blockchain beyond development and crypto to better harness its power and capability. You will learn tips to start your own project, and best practices for testing, security, and even compliance. Immerse yourself in this technology and review key topics such as cryptoeconomics, coding your own Blockchain P2P network, different consensus mechanisms, decentralized ledger, mining, wallets, blocks, and transactions.

Additionally, this book provides you with hands-on practical tools and examples for creating smart contracts and dApps for different blockchains such as Ethereum, NEO, EOS, and Hyperledger. Aided by practical, real-world coding examples, you’ll see how to build dApps with Angular utilizing typescript from start to finish, connect to the blockchain network locally on a test network, and publish on the production mainnet environment.

Don’t be left out of the next technology revolution – become a Blockchain developer using The Blockchain Developer today.

What You’ll Learn

Explore the Blockchain ecosystem is and the different consensus mechanisms

Create miners, wallets, transactions, distributed networks and DApps

Review the main features of Bitcoin: Ethereum, NEO and EOS, and Hyperledger are

Interact with popular node clients as well as implementing your own Blockchain

Publish and test your projects for security and scalability

Who This Book Is For

Developers, architects and engineers who are interested in learning about Blockchain or implementing Blockchain into a new greenfield project or integrating Blockchain into a brownfield project. Technical entrepreneurs, technical investors or even executives who want to better understand Blockchain technology and its potential.

Table of Contents

Chapter 1. Blockchain Basics

Abstract
This chapter will serve as your ground school before you “take off” toward development. It will introduce basic concepts that will help you to understand the blockchain technology. This chapter is split into four parts.
Elad Elrom

Chapter 2. Blockchain Nodes

Abstract
In the previous chapter, I covered basic concepts related to blockchain and the pieces that make up an individual blockchain. I covered how blockchain technology solved the double spending problem by utilizing a P2P network, which led to the creation of a global distributed shared ledger and digital cash. The blockchain P2P network is stitched together by connecting multiple nodes, and in this chapter, you will be taking a closer look at the nodes that make up the network.
Elad Elrom

Chapter 3. Creating Your Own Blockchain

Abstract
In this chapter, I will cover how to build your very own blockchain P2P network. This is a seven-step process, so in each section I’ll start with a brief introduction followed by an exercise. You can download the code for each of the following exercises from GitHub and follow along:
Elad Elrom

Chapter 4. Bitcoin Wallets and Transactions

Abstract
In this chapter, you will be diving deep into bitcoin’s core RPC and learn about wallets and transactions. You will learn how to utilize legacy and SegWit’s bitcoin wallets. You will extract a wallet’s public and private keys.
Elad Elrom

Chapter 5. Ethereum Wallets and Smart Contracts

Abstract
In Chapter 1, I introduced Ethereum when I covered bitcoin, altcoins, and different consensus mechanisms. Specifically, I covered Ethereum’s PoW consensus and how utilizing Ethereum enables developers to create their own smart contracts and tokens. I mentioned that the Ethereum tokens can be generated as Ethereum requests for comment (ERCs) such as ERC-20, ERC-223, or ERC-777. In Chapter 3, you created your own blockchain, and I covered bitcoin wallets and transactions.
Elad Elrom

Chapter 6. EOS.IO Wallets and Smart Contracts

Abstract
In Chapter 2, I introduced EOS.IO when I covered bitcoin, altcoins, and different consensus mechanisms. Specifically, I covered how EOS.IO is an example of altcoins that turn into tokens; you created an EOS block producer and were able to create a full node capable of mining EOS tokens. Ethereum was the beginning of your blockchain smart contract development, and you learned to use the Solidity language to write smart contracts and dapps. EOS.IO has created a more robust architecture than Ethereum for smart contract and dapp development.
Elad Elrom

Chapter 7. NEO Blockchain and Smart Contracts

Abstract
In Chapter 1, I covered the NEO proof of stake (PoS) blockchain consensus mechanism. In Chapter 2, you created a NEO bookkeeping node on AWS Ubuntu and learned how to request a consensus authority certificate and get elected as a bookkeeper.
Elad Elrom

Chapter 8. Hyperledger

Abstract
In previous chapters, I covered blockchain technologies that are focused on cryptocurrency, and in fact, each project I have covered so far has included its own currency. Hyperledger is different; it does not have a currency attached, although you can create a coin if needed. Instead, Hyperledger was created with the aim of being an open source platform targeted at utilizing blockchain to fit business needs.
Elad Elrom

Chapter 9. Build Dapps with Angular: Part I

Abstract
In previous chapters, I covered different blockchains, and you learned how to create smart contracts that can interact with a blockchain. You created smart contracts in Ethereum, NEO, EOS, and Hyperledger. In Chapter 1, I broke down the process into five layers: consensus layer, miner or booking layer, propagation layer, semantic layer, and application layer. Smart contracts are part of the application layer in the development cycle; however, the application layer is incomplete without having a front-end interface that enables a developer or end user to interact with the blockchain.
Elad Elrom

Chapter 10. Build Dapps with Angular: Part II

Abstract
In the previous chapter, you started developing your dapp. Specifically, you learned about dapp classifications and projects and that you can break your own dapp project into five steps. You then looked at why to use Angular and its benefits. Next, you created an Angular project, first ensuring the prerequisites were installed and then installing the Angular CLI. You looked at the pieces that make up Angular such as components, modules, and directives. You also learned how to style a dapp by understanding Angular-style architecture and working with Angular Material. You started building your own custom components and creating content; you split your app into a footer, header, and body and created a custom transfer component that you will be using in this chapter.
Elad Elrom

Chapter 11. Security and Compliance

Abstract
As you have seen, most blockchains are decentralized, and the identity of each party is normally protected; however, most blockchain-related code involves storing some confidential data such as a user’s personal information, passwords, cryptocurrency, and wallets.
Elad Elrom

Chapter 12. Blockchain Beyond Crypto

Abstract
As you are approaching the last pages of this book, I wanted to inspire you and help you see what’s possible in the coming years from the blockchain technology. Crypto paved the way by providing an alternative to fiat currency with the introduction of bitcoin. Although the invention of bitcoin was more than a decade ago (it was introduced in 2008), blockchain is still in its infancy. However, it’s poised to potentially become one the most useful technological innovations of the 21st century.
Elad Elrom
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